Now Schools Promoting BYOD Culture Among Students

The corporate world had been taking a milder stand on bringing personal devices at work for some time now. It seems perhaps the same intentions are being displayed by the educational institutes as well.

A few schools like Delhi Public School & Dehradun’s Doon School have started to take a completely supportive stand towards students bringing in electronic gadgets like tablets, smartphones & even laptops to school.

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How do the schools justify the stand? The Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) culture has given many a scare to companies thanks to the ever expanding & vulnerable ecosystem of the devices. Since these gadgets cannot be completely protected by the IT Policy of the company, the data & other sensitive corporate material is at risk.

In case of education though, the educationists feel the era of Digital Education is here & there is no point in restricting the spread of the same, shared Monica Chopra, headmistress at Millennium School in Lucknow, “Teaching isn’t done the chalk and duster method anymore. Students are getting inquisitive by the day and we need to adopt new methods to teach them”. Another outlook is that kids will get proficient at using these modern day electronics at an young age & that these devices  can certainly boost study-related research.

Are there any pitfalls? While corporates worry about data theft & financial losses arising out of them, the educational sector should worry about the ill-effects of these gadgets. Many of the smartphones, tablets & other devices can easily access internet. Under such circumstances, kids could spend a lot of time surfing websites or socializing.

What can be done? Restrictive hardware & OS ecosystem could perhaps be a solution. Aakash, the ultra-affordable tablet being handed out to students may be running enough safety checks to prevent the student from accessing anything other than study related material. But, since schools are encouraging BYOD to schools, this proposition seems a bit futile. What do you think could be an optimal compromise to ensure kids use these devices only for education?

Image Source | Nation.lk

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