Facebook Fatigue Is A Real Thing: US Survey

It has happened many times to me! There have been countless times when I have decided that Facebook is a big waste of my time because of the banality of the content that floods my timeline. Besides that I have also found that none of Facebook’s social designs work for me when it comes to content consumption and sharing. There are too many privacy risks attached with Facebook. That being said, I have to point out that I am nowhere near quitting Facebook because I use Facebook’s messenger quite a bit. Facebook also helps me remember birthdays and lets me check out some interesting events and organize my own too! So what I really have a problem with is actually the newsfeed and social app requests that keep clogging my Facebook inbox.

The thing is that this so-called Facebook fatigue is actually a very real thing and a lot of people are experiencing it. A study commissioned by the Pew Internet and American Life Project and conducted by Princeton Survey Research Associates International has found that a lot of US users suffer from this kind of fatigue too! They conducted this study on 1006 adults in the US. The study reports that around 61% of the users who responded said that they had taken week long breaks from the social networking site. The ones who took a break are further divided  into 3 categories. 21% were very busy  to use it daily, 10% lost interest in it and the final 10% felt that ‘Facebooking’ was not adding any value to their lives.

Given below is a table from the study which includes the breakdown.


Like I said in the beginning of this post, most of us would not abandon Facebook completely because it is the easiest way to reach and connect with friends, family and acquaintances, no matter where they are in the world. Many of us still use it for that, but the study points out that we are not completely hooked to it. We need to take a break from it once in awhile. 42% of of the Facebook users who were in the age segment 18-29  and 34% of those within the age segment of 20-49 said that they were using Facebook lesser with respect to time spent on the website daily. 69% of those polled however said that they would spend the same amount of time on the social network this year while 27% of those polled said that they would be reducing the time spent on it.

One more factor highlighted by the study is that young people, especially teenagers are not so enthused about Facebook anymore. 38% of those polled who were in the age segment of 18-29 said that they would reducing their usage in 2013. Facebook knows this because that is exactly what they warned their investors about. All the young people are finding newer apps and services outside of Facebook and this is major new area of concern for the social network’s longevity now that they have kinda figured mobile out.

This study (provided it is accurate) however deals with US audiences who have had access to Facebook much earlier than Indians have had. Even though Facebook is big in India, it is still being discovered by Indians who are getting their hands on mobile Internet for the first time. So even if the US users collectively move on to some other thing, India and other emerging markets will still stand for the social network, provided they pay enough attention and innovate by keeping in mind the consumer mindset and behaviour. Emerging markets are fair battlegrounds for many social networks, as there is a lot of potential in getting new,  engaged users due to the low penetration of Internet. That is not going to be there for too long as mobile Internet is growing by leaps and bounds in these markets. Hence we see many other players like WeChat, Line etc. trying to break in here.

Who do you think stands a chance? Share your view with us.

Story Source | Cnet

Image Source | Table From Pew Internet and Top Image depicting a man on chair from Shutterstock

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